Gemstone Education and Guidance

 

Colored gemstones add life and beauty to any jewelry collection. The array of colored gems is seemingly endless, from the rare and costly Ruby, Emerald, and Sapphire to the much more plentiful but just as beautiful Amethyst and Garnet. The colors can harmonize in unique ways with different precious metals. Many colored stones require different treatment than diamonds, and most colored gemstone jewelry should be cleaned gently with a soft toothbrush and a solution of mild dish soap and warm water.

 

Emerald – The incomparable green of an emerald is produced under extremely rare conditions. Because these conditions result in tiny cracks and cavities in the stone, inclusions are allowed in top-quality emeralds. Emeralds are rated “fair to good” for everyday wear with care, with a hardness of 7.5-8. Avoid exposure to heat and contact with chemicals.

 

Ruby – One of the rarest and most prized gemstones, Ruby’s color ranges from light pinkish red to dark slightly purplish red. Rubies are rated “excellent” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 9. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals.

 

Sapphire – While the classic blue sapphire which ranges from deepest midnight blue to brilliant cornflower remains the most popular, sapphires can be found in almost every color of the rainbow. Sapphires are rated “excellent” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 9. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals.

 

Aquamarine – Its name means “ocean water”, and its color is as refreshing as it sounds. Aquamarine is available in many shades of blue, ranging from deep and intense to lightest sky blue.  It is rated “good” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 7.5-8.  Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows.

 

Morganite – Also known as “Pink Beryl”,  Morganite is found in varying shades of light peachy pink. It is rated “good” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 7.5-8. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows.

 

Opal – The background color of an opal can be white, yellow, orange, red, or black, but it is prized for its intense play of color. A good opal should display a rich range of color flashes. Take care when wearing Opal, it has a hardness of 5-6.5. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows.

 

Tanzanite – Unknown until 1967, Tanzanite is a relative newcomer in the gem world. The most highly valued Tanzanite is a deep, vivid purplish blue. It is not for everyday wear, and one should take care when wearing; it has a hardess of 6-7. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. Avoid contact with chemicals.

 

Tourmaline – A lesser-known but very beautiful gem; Tourmaline is available in a range of rich greens, pinks, and blues. It is rated “fair to good” for everyday wear with care, with a hardness of 7-7.5 .  Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows.

 

Amethyst –A gemstone of enduring popularity, Amethyst can be found in many shades of purple, from deep and rich to palest lavender.  It is rated “good” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 7. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals.

 

Citrine – At once sunny and mellow, Citrine ranges from slightly golden yellow to a medium gold showing hints of orange. It is rated “good” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 7. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals.

 

Garnet – Once believed to ward off evil and to have healing powers, lovely Garnets can be found in a wide variety of colors, ranging from deep red with hints of orange and brown, to paler pinkish red, to a bright orange, and even to the rare Tsavorite Garnet, which is a brilliant green. It is rated “good” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 7-7.5. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature.

 

Iolite – Violet, the  last color on the spectrum visible to the human eye, has an ethereal quality which is well expressed in these gems, which range from light to dark shades of the beautiful purplish-blue. Iolite is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care, with a hardness of 7-7.5. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows.

 

Jade – Prized by many cultures, Nephrite Jade is a deep moss or apple green. It is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care, with a hardness of 6-6.5. Avoid exposure to heat, contact with chemicals, and protect from scratches and harsh blows.

 

Peridot – Sometimes nicknamed “Evening Emerald” because its color doesn’t fade in low lighting, Peridot is found in crisp shades of medium to dark yellowish green.  It is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care, with a hardness of 6.5-7. Avoid exposure to heat and sudden changes in temperature. Avoid contact with chemicals. 

 

Quartz – With high quality gems readily available in larger sizes, quartz is a popular choice for jewelry and can be had in a wide variety of colors. Quartz is rated “good” for everyday wear, with a hardness of 7. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals.

 

Topaz – Blue Topaz is very popular and ranges from a light sky blue to the bright Swiss blue and the deep London blue. The more costly “Precious Topaz” is available in a range of warm peachy golden hues. Blue Topaz is rated “fair to good” for everyday wear with care, with a hardness of 8. Avoid direct sunlight and exposure to heat, which may cause color to fade. Avoid contact with chemicals.

 

Turquoise – A beautiful  blend of sea and sky; the finest  turquoise is a lovely opaque blue green. It is rated “fair” for everyday wear with care, with a hardness of 5-6.  Avoid exposure to heat and protect from scratches and harsh blows.

 

Pearls – Rich and lustrous, natural and cultured pearls can be found in all shades of white and cream, as well as the beautiful Tahitian or “black pearl”. Pearls are not for everyday wear, and one should take care when wearing; they have a hardness of 2.5-4. Avoid exposure to heat and protect from scratches and harsh blows. Avoid contact with chemicals, especially perfumes, perspiration, and hair sprays. To clean, wipe gently with a moist cloth.

 

Popular Birthstones

 

January - Garnet

February - Amethyst

March - Aquamarine

April - Diamond

May - Emerald

June – Pearl, Moonstone

July - Ruby

August - Peridot

September - Sapphire

October – Opal, Tourmaline

November – Yellow Topaz, Citrine

December – Blue Topaz

© 2018 K. STONEHILL CREATIONS ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  |  Proudly created by Guy BenAmi

 

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